General

K9 Fiction: Mysteries, Suspense, and Thrillers

 

Drug sniffing Belgian Malinois, Police Officer Joy

 

Are you a dog owner or a dog lover who loves to read mysteries and thrillers? Then this list was created for you. These are military and law enforcement novels featuring dogs in a primary role. Several of the books were recommended by fans of the Nightstand Book Reviews website, and others were suggested by NBR subscribers themselves.

 

Click on the author names. Those links will take you to their websites and more information about the novels. Let us know in the comments below if you have enjoyed the books.  🙂

 

Robert Crais  “Suspect” & “The Promise,” feature Maggie, the police dog and her handler Scott James, both war veterans. “Suspect” has been optioned for a movie.

 

Susan Furlong  “Splintered Silence,” Book #1 in the Bone Gap Travellers series. A war veteran and her injured military dog return to Appalachia and solve a crime. Rave reviews. More books on the way.

 

Alex Kava   “Breaking Creed” is Book #1 in the Ryder Creed series. Ex-Marine, Ryder Creed, and his K-9 Search and Rescue dogs, team with FBI profiler Maggie O’Dell.

 

Diane Kelly  “Paw Enforcement” is the first book of nine in the Paw Enforcement Mystery series. Police officer Megan Luz and her loyal K-9 partner Brigit, are the heart of the series.

 

Ronie Kendig  A Breed Apart faith based, action oriented series about military war dogs and their handlers.

 

Margaret Mizushima “Killing Trail” is the first of the award-winning Timber Creek K9 Mysteries featuring Deputy Mattie Cobb, her police dog partner Robo, and veterinarian Cole Walker. Set in Colorado.

 

Paula Munier  “Borrowing of Bones” features a retired soldier and her bomb-sniffing dog who work with U.S. Game Warden Troy Warner and his Search and Rescue canine, in a mystery set in rural Vermont.

 

Barbara Nickless  “Blood on the Tracks” Railroad police Special Agent Sydney Parnell and her K9 partner Clyde, solve crimes in this gritty new thriller series.

 

Spencer Quinn   Chet and Bernie Mysteries with Chet, the canine narrator, who works alongside Bernie, a down-on-his-luck private investigator.

 

Nora Roberts “The Search” Search and Rescue dog trainer/romantic suspense set in the Pacific Northwest.

 

James Rollins and Grant Blackwood, The Tucker Wayne series. Part of the Sigma Force world, featuring former Army Ranger Tucker Wayne and Kane, his military working dog companion.

 

David Rosenfelt  Andy Carpenter series. Carpenter is a New Jersey lawyer, a dog lover whose cases always revolve around dogs.

Bloodhound, Police Officer Bocephus

 

Happy Reading!   🙂

 

 

 

 

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Try Something New This Summer

 

Every once in a while, avid readers take a break from their favorite genre and venture into ‘summer reading,’ where the world is either a warm, happy, safe place, or the mishaps that occur are slapstick funny and somebody always has your back. No world crises, no exploding planets, just stories that bring a smile to your face.
 


A few of us indulge our curiosity about demons and witches – as long as the hero/heroines are owners of tea and herb shops, that is.


Then there are the ancient curses that awaken and wreak havoc upon those that get in the way.


If you are primarily a fan of fiction as I am, a foray into the realm of serious non-fiction most often occurs when a compelling true story crosses our paths.


Take a look at the suggestions below and try something a bit different this season.


Happily Ever After

“Sand Dollar Cove,” by Nancy Naigle, is the completely delightful story of a beach area recently hit by bad weather, with people working together to rebuild it. The town relies on tourism to stay afloat, so one of the business owners organizes a fundraising event. We must suspend our disbelief while the rapidly approaching deadline looms to get the work done, but the lead characters are so endearing that we want them to be super human, have their wishes come true, and save the pier. Just in time for summer reading, “Sand Dollar Cove” includes a budding romance between a stranger and our heroine, and the almost magical sand dollars. This could easily fit into the Hallmark Channel lineup of happily ever after stories.


P.I. for Dummies

“Choke,” by Kaye George

Imogene Duckworthy wants to become a private eye, but has no training whatsoever. She gets a book – “P.I. for Dummies,” and has business cards made. Our  hapless heroine feels that she is qualified to ‘detect’ because she found a neighbor’s missing puppy. How hard could it be?

 

This high school graduate, an unwed mother, works for her Uncle at his diner, and when he is found dead, she tries to solve the case. Duckworthy is too naïve to recognize the crooks right in front of her and swoons at the sight of long legs and a smile. Me, oh, my, this gal is in trouble. She is in and out of jail, escapes from cops who are not after her and sees disasters and threats where none exist.

 

“Choke” is a comedy read that takes nothing seriously in solving a mystery – except the lead character herself. What in the world could go wrong? (First book in the series by Agatha nominated, Kaye George) Set near the Oklahoma border, people familiar with the North Texas area will recognize a certain town with fake falls in ‘Wymee Falls.’

 

 

 

Witches, Demons, Wiccans, and ordinary folk

“Booke of the Hidden,” by award-winning author Jeri Westerson, came to Jeri in a dream. Known for her medieval mysteries, her dream was so compelling that she had to write it down, and a few paragraphs turned into this first book in a new series.

 

Kylie Strange has moved to a small Maine town to open a tea and herb shop, and during the shop renovation, she discovers a mysterious book that is older than anyone in town and is completely blank. The locals are more than they seem, there are secrets behind every door, deaths occur in her wake, and Kylie has more than one ‘Being’ interested in her. “Booke of the Hidden” is sexy and funny, with adult themes and situations, with the demons and witches, Wiccans, and assorted other supernatural sorts inhabiting the quaint village. Quick-witted, up-for-everything, crossbow wielding Kylie Strange, is a great new character in the genre.

 

 

Theological Suspense

“Aceldama,” by John Hazen

A coin from the time of Christ is passed through the centuries with dire consequences for its unwitting possessors. A present-day couple faces the wrath of its curse when the husband falls ill. The wife must uncover the reason for his illness before her husband dies – defying logic, the law, and the hierarchy of the Catholic Church.

International connections and supportive friends make “Aceldama” an absorbing read as we discover the identity, power, and meaning of the coin. Several surprises along the way keep the pages turning.

 

 

Non-Fiction

“Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI,” by David Grann.

This award-winning, non-fiction account feels like a novel of suspense. Grann recounts the tragedies that unfolded as members of the Osage Nation in Oklahoma were displaced, swindled, and murdered in a pattern of corruption and greed at the highest levels of government at the beginning of the twentieth century. At the source of it all? Oil fields that lay under lands given to the Osage Nation. Grann researched the court cases and news of the 1890s and early 1900s, includes photos of the stakeholders, and weaves all of the information into a compelling read. While not the only reason for the creation of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Osage cases made an additional convincing argument for the establishment of a national investigative agency.

 

Stretch your reading horizons and try something new this summer.  🙂

 

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The Agatha Awards for 2017 Books

 

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The winners for the Agatha Awards for 2017 Books (named for Agatha Christie) have been announced. The awards were bestowed upon mystery and crime writers at the annual Malice Domestic conference in late April, 2018. The nominated books were first published in the United States by a living author between January 1 and December 31, 2017.
 

The Agatha Awards recognize the "traditional mystery," meaning that there is no graphic sex and no excessive violence in the writing. Thrillers or hard-boiled detectives cannot be found here, but instead, picture Miss Marple or Hercule Poirot at work.
 

Congratulations to all the nominees and winners (indicated in red).  🙂

 

Best Contemporary Novel 
“Death Overdue: A Haunted Library Mystery” by Allison Brook
“A Cajun Christmas Killing: A Cajun Country Mystery” by Ellen Byron
“No Way Home: A Zoe Chambers Mystery” by Annette Dashofy
“Take Out” by Margaret Maron
“Glass Houses: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel” by Louise Penny

 

Best Historical Novel 
“In Farleigh Field” by Rhys Bowen
“Murder in an English Village: A Beryl and Edwina Mystery” by Jessica Ellicott
“Called to Justice: A Quaker Midwife Mystery” by Edith Maxwell
“The Paris Spy: A Maggie Hope Mystery” by Susan Elia MacNeal
“Dangerous to Know: A Lillian Frost and Edith Head Novel” by Renee Patrick

 

Best First Novel 
“Adrift: A Mer Cavallo Mystery” by Micki Browning
“The Plot is Murder: Mystery Bookshop” by V.M. Burns
“Hollywood Homicide: A Detective by Day Mystery” by Kellye Garrett
“Daughters of Bad Men” by Laura Oles
“Protocol: A Maggie O'Malley Mystery” by Kathleen Valenti

 

Best Nonfiction 
“From Holmes to Sherlock: The Story of the Men and Women Who Created an Icon” by Mattias Boström
“The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books” by Martin Edwards
“American Fire: Love, Arson and Life in a Vanishing Land” by Monica Hesse
“Rewrite Your Life: Discover Your Truth Through the Healing Power of Fiction” by Jess Lourey  

“Manderley Forever: A Biography of Daphne du Maurier” by Tatiana de Rosnay
 

Best Short Story 
“Double Deck the Halls” by Gretchen Archer
“Whose Wine is it Anyway” by Barb Goffman in 50 Shades of Cabernet
“The Night They Burned Miss Dixie’s Place” by Debra Goldstein in Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine (May/June 2017)
“The Library Ghost of Tanglewood Inn” by Gigi Pandian
“A Necessary Ingredient” by Art Taylor in Coast to Coast: Private Eyes from Sea to Shining Seat

 

Best Children’s/Young Adult 
“City of Angels” by Kristi Belcamino
“Sydney Mackenzie Knocks 'Em Dead” by Cindy Callaghan
“The World’s Greatest Detective” by Caroline Carlson
“Audacity Jones Steals the Show” by Kirby Larson
“The Harlem Charade” by Natasha Tarpley


Malice-AgathasPhoto
Happy Reading!

 

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New York Times – Top Five Best Fiction for 2017

 

Book Cover - Pachinko

The New York Times Top Five Best Fiction Books of 2017 list was posted on November 30th. It’s always interesting to see which books editors at the NYT will choose for their “Best of…” lists for the year. The titles are sometimes bestsellers, but more importantly, the editors have fallen in love with the story (or the writing) and Wahoo! the book makes the list.

 

Check out the top five fiction choices from 2017, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. Click on the links below the book titles to read their reviews.

 

 

“Autumn” by Ali Smith
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/17/books/review/autumn-ali-smith.html

 

 

“Exit West” by Mohsin Hamid

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/books/review/exit-west-mohsin-hamid.html

 

 

“Pachinko” by Min Jin Lee

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/02/books/review/pachinko-min-jin-lee.html

 

 

“The Power” by Naomi Alderman

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/25/books/review/naomi-alderman-power.html

 

 

“Sing, Unburied, Sing” by Jesmyn Ward

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/22/books/review/tracy-k-smith-on-sing-unburied-sing-jesmyn-ward.html?_r=0

 

Let us know in the comments if you’ve read any of the books. Happy Reading!  

 

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Pulitzer Prize – 2017

 

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The Pulitzer Prize is an award given for work published the previous year in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and the arts in the United States. Joseph Pulitzer, an innovative newspaper publisher, endowed Columbia University in New York City with $2 million in his 1904 will. Columbia was to create the School of Journalism, as well as scholarships and prizes to promote excellence in certain fields. The intent of the gift was “for the encouragement of public service, public morals, American literature, and the advancement of education."

 

The President of Columbia has the honor of presenting the yearly awards selected by the Pulitzer Prize board. Pulitzer has evolved over the decades and an expanded prize list now also includes the digital age. The judging is rigorous and to win is considered by many to be the pinnacle in a career.

Click on the titles to read more about each of the books.
 

Fiction 2017

Presented for distinguished fiction published in book form during the previous year by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. Fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).
 

The Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead (Doubleday)

"For a smart melding of realism and allegory that combines the violence of slavery and the drama of escape in a myth that speaks to contemporary America."

Other finalists:

Imagine Me Gone, by Adam Haslett (Little, Brown)

The Sport of Kings, by C. E. Morgan (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

 

General Nonfiction 2017

For a distinguished and appropriately documented book of nonfiction by an American author that is not eligible for consideration in any other category. Fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).
 

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, by Matthew Desmond (Crown)

"For a deeply researched exposé that showed how mass evictions after the 2008 economic crash were less a consequence than a cause of poverty."

Other finalists:

In a Different Key: The Story of Autism, by John Donvan and Caren Zucker (Crown)

The Politics of Mourning: Death and Honor in Arlington National Cemetery, by Micki McElya (Harvard University Press)

 

Congratulations to all for this wonderful achievement.  🙂

 

Please visit www.pulitzer.org for more information and for the list of prizewinners in other disciplines.

 

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Goodreads Choice Awards – 2017


 

GoodreadsChoiceLogo2017

 

 

Most of the winners of major book awards are selected by members of the groups that give the award – much like the film industry’s Academy Awards are selected each year. Mystery writers vote on the major mystery awards; romance writers vote on the Rita Award, etc.

 

 

 


Goodreads, the popular readers/authors site, has a slightly different model for the Goodreads Choice Awards. During the year, readers chat about books they’re reading and make lists of their favorites for their friends and followers to see. They also rank books they’ve read with stars, indicating how much they liked (or disliked) the titles published that year. There are thousands of books listed on the site, with thousands of comments, giving anyone who’s interested a way to see how a book (published in the U.S. in English) is viewed by the Goodreads group. Amazon acquired Goodreads, so these reviews and stars probably have an impact on book sales.

 

 


During October each year, the Goodreads staff looks at the stats and does the math, then nominates 15 books for each of 20 categories that have an average rating of 3.5 stars or more.

 

 


The members of the Goodreads community vote in elimination rounds. They are allowed to vote in all twenty categories, giving a broader view of a book’s popularity. If you sign up to become a member of Goodreads, you can vote as well.

 

 


Opening round now closed  (voting on the selected 15 in each category, write-ins accepted) : Oct. 31st thru Nov. 5th

 

 

 

Semifinal Round now closed: Nov. 7th thru Nov. 12th  (voting on the original 15 along with the top 5 write-ins in each category – voters can change their minds about the original vote):

 

 

Final Round now closed: Nov. 14th thru Nov. 27th  (voting on final top 10 books in each category)

 

It's December 5th and the winners have been announced. Click on the links and see how close the voting in some categories was.

 

 

Here are the 2017 links for eight of the categories (once there, the other twelve categories are an easy click away):

Fiction

Mystery & Thriller

Historical Fiction

Fantasy

Romance

Science Fiction

Non-Fiction

YA Fantasy & Science Fiction

 

 

 

 

The 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards went to:

Fiction: Liane Moriarty “Truly Madly Guilty”

Mystery & Thriller: Stephen King  “End of Watch”

Historical Fiction: Colson Whitehead “The Underground Railroad”

Fantasy: J.K. Rowling “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”

Romance: Colleen Hoover  “It Ends With Us”

Science Fiction: Pierce Brown  “Morning Star”

Non-Fiction: Lin-Manuel Miranda, Jeremy Carter “Hamilton: The Revolution”

YA Fantasy & Science Fiction: Sarah J. Maas  “Court of Mist and Fury”

 

 

Did you read any of the winning choices from 2016? If so, what did you think? Let us know in the comment section.

 

 

The 2015 Goodreads Choice Awards went to:

Fiction: Harper Lee’s “Go Set a Watchman”

Mystery & Thriller:  Paula Hawkins’ “The Girl on the Train”

Historical Fiction:  Kristin Hannah’s “The Nightingale”

Fantasy:  Neil Gaiman’s “Trigger Warning”

Romance:  Colleen Hoover’s “Confess”

Science Fiction: Pierce Brown’s “Golden Son”

 

 

 

The 2014 Goodreads Choice Awards went to:

Fiction: Rainbow Rowell's "Landline"

Mystery & Thriller:  Stephen King's "Mr. Mercedes" 

Historical Fiction:  Anthony Doerr's "All the Light We Cannot See"

History & Biography:  Helen Rappaport's The Romanov Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Daughters of Nicholas and Alexandra"

Romance:  Diana Gabaldon's "Written in My Own Heart's Blood"

Science Fiction:  Andy Weir's "The Martian"

 

 

The 12 additional categories include cookbooks, horror, non-fiction, children’s books and more.

 

 

It’s interesting to note that in 2013, 1,953,770 total votes were cast for the Goodreads Choice Awards.

The final tabulation for 2015 was 3,007,748 votes.

In 2016?  3,550,346 votes.    🙂

This year's final total was 3,887,698!

 

Happy reading! You're in for a treat.  🙂

 

 

 

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The Man Booker Prize International – 2017

 

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Famous for its celebration of global fiction, this year’s Man Booker International Prize  competition was among the 13 titles in the longlist below. The £50,000 prize is divided equally between the author of the winning book and its translator. Previously, the prize had been given every other year to an author for an entire body of work. The new version of the Man Book International Prize acknowledges the importance of the quality of a translation in a global publication and is now given annually. The books must have been translated into English and published in the UK.
 

The six titles in the short list group are listed in bold type. The winner is indicated in red.

Click on the book titles to discover more information about the books.
 

Mathias Enard        "Compass"                                     

Translated by Charlotte Mandell
 


Wioletta Greg            "Swallowing Mercury"                 

Translated by Eliza Marciniak

 

David Grossman    "A Horse Walks Into a Bar"  

Translated by Jessica Cohen

 

Stefan Hertmans      "War and Turpentine"                 

Translated by David McKay

 

Roy Jacobsen          "The Unseen"                                 

Translated by Don Bartlett

 

Ismail Kadare           "The Traitor’s Niche"                   

Translated by John Hodgson

 

Yan Lianke               "The Explosion Chronicles"       

Translated by Carlos Rojas

 

Alain Mabanckou       "Black Moses"                          

Translated by Helen Stevenson

 

Clemens Meyer         "Bricks and Mortar"                    

Translated by Katy Derbyshire

 

Dorthe Nors             "Mirror, Shoulder, Signal"          

Translated by Misha Hoekstra

 

Amos Oz                   "Judas"                                          

Translated by Nicholas de Lange

 

Samanta Schweblin     "Fever Dream"                        

Translated by Megan McDowell

 

Jón Kalman Stefánsson   "Fish Have No Feet"        

Translated by Phil Roughton

 

Congratulations to all the nominees and to the winner!  🙂

 

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