General

Man Booker International Prize – 2019

 

The Man Booker International Prize celebrates the finest works of translated fiction from around the world. The £50,000 prize for the winning book is divided equally between its author and translator. The 2019 finalists are listed below, with the winner indicated in red.

Author
(Origin Language Country/territory)

 Translator

Title

 


Jokha Alharthi
(Arabic – Oman)

 Marilyn Booth

"Celestial Bodies"

 


Annie Ernaux
(French – France)

 Alison L. Strayer

"The Years"

 


Marion Poschmann
(German – Germany)

 Jen Calleja

"The Pine Islands"

 

 

Olga Tokarczuk
(Polish – Poland)

 

Antonia Lloyd-Jones

 

"Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead"

 

 

Juan Gabriel Vásquez
(Spanish – Colombia)

 

Anne McLean

 

"The Shape of The Ruins"

 

 

Alia Trabucco Zerán
(Spanish – Chile)

 

Sophie Hughes

 

"The Remainder"

 

 

 

The shortlist was selected by a panel of five judges, chaired by Bettany Hughes, award-winning historian, author and broadcaster, and is made up of writer, translator, and chair of English PEN Maureen Freely; philosopher Professor Angie Hobbs; novelist and satirist Elnathan John, and essayist and novelist Pankaj Mishra.

 

The winner of the 2019 prize was announced on 21 May at a formal dinner at the Roundhouse in London. Congratulations to all! 

 

 

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New York Times Notable Non-fiction – 2018

 

The New York Times Notable Non-fiction of 2018 list consists of books selected by the editors of the NYT Book Review. It contains a mix of biographies, insights into historical American subjects, along with books that deal with contemporary societal issues. Here are ten of the NYT Notable Non-fiction Book Review editors’ selections for 2018. Click on the book titles to read the reviews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arthur Ashe: A Life”  by Raymond Arsenault.  

 

 

“Boom Town: The Fantastical Saga of Oklahoma City” by Sam Anderson

 

American Prison: A Reporter’s Undercover Journey Into the Business of Punishment”  by Shane Bauer

 

Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup”  by John Carreyrou

 

Ali: A Life”  by Jonathan Eig

 

American Dialogue: The Founders and Us”  by Joseph J. Ellis

 

Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America”  by Eliza Griswold

 

Brothers of the Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War”  by Marwan Hisham and Molly Crabapple

 

“American Eden: David Hosack, Botany and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic” by Victoria Johnson

 

Churchill: Walking With Destiny” by Andrew Roberts

 

Calypso”  by David Sedaris                                   

 

 

 

 

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New York Times Notable Fiction – 2018

 

The New York Times Notable Fiction of 2018 list has been posted. It’s always interesting to see which books the Book Review editors will choose for their “Best of…” lists for the year. The titles are sometimes bestsellers, sometimes from debut authors, several from international writers, but more importantly, the NYT Book Review editors have fallen in love with the story (or the writing) and ta-da! the book makes the list.

 

Check out ten of their notable fiction choices from 2018. Click on the book titles to read their reviews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"An American Marriage"  by Tayari Jones

 

"Cherry"  by Nico Walker

 

"Eternal Life"  by Dara Horn

 

"The Friend"  by Sigrid Nunez

 

"The House of Broken Angels"  by Luis Alberto Urrea

 

"Macbeth"  by Jo Nesbø. Translated by Don Bartlett

 

"Mirror, Shoulder, Signal"  by Dorthe Nors

 

"My Year of Rest and Relaxation"  by Ottessa Moshfegh

 

"There There"  by Tommy Orange

 

"Warlight"  by Michael Ondaatje

 

Happy reading!   🙂

 

 

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Try Something New This Summer

 

Every once in a while, avid readers take a break from their favorite genre and venture into ‘summer reading,’ where the world is either a warm, happy, safe place, or the mishaps that occur are slapstick funny and somebody always has your back. No world crises, no exploding planets, just stories that bring a smile to your face.
 


A few of us indulge our curiosity about demons and witches – as long as the hero/heroines are owners of tea and herb shops, that is.


Then there are the ancient curses that awaken and wreak havoc upon those that get in the way.


If you are primarily a fan of fiction as I am, a foray into the realm of serious non-fiction most often occurs when a compelling true story crosses our paths.


Take a look at the suggestions below and try something a bit different this season.


Happily Ever After

“Sand Dollar Cove,” by Nancy Naigle, is the completely delightful story of a beach area recently hit by bad weather, with people working together to rebuild it. The town relies on tourism to stay afloat, so one of the business owners organizes a fundraising event. We must suspend our disbelief while the rapidly approaching deadline looms to get the work done, but the lead characters are so endearing that we want them to be super human, have their wishes come true, and save the pier. Just in time for summer reading, “Sand Dollar Cove” includes a budding romance between a stranger and our heroine, and the almost magical sand dollars. This could easily fit into the Hallmark Channel lineup of happily ever after stories.


P.I. for Dummies

“Choke,” by Kaye George

Imogene Duckworthy wants to become a private eye, but has no training whatsoever. She gets a book – “P.I. for Dummies,” and has business cards made. Our  hapless heroine feels that she is qualified to ‘detect’ because she found a neighbor’s missing puppy. How hard could it be?

 

This high school graduate, an unwed mother, works for her Uncle at his diner, and when he is found dead, she tries to solve the case. Duckworthy is too naïve to recognize the crooks right in front of her and swoons at the sight of long legs and a smile. Me, oh, my, this gal is in trouble. She is in and out of jail, escapes from cops who are not after her and sees disasters and threats where none exist.

 

“Choke” is a comedy read that takes nothing seriously in solving a mystery – except the lead character herself. What in the world could go wrong? (First book in the series by Agatha nominated, Kaye George) Set near the Oklahoma border, people familiar with the North Texas area will recognize a certain town with fake falls in ‘Wymee Falls.’

 

 

 

Witches, Demons, Wiccans, and ordinary folk

“Booke of the Hidden,” by award-winning author Jeri Westerson, came to Jeri in a dream. Known for her medieval mysteries, her dream was so compelling that she had to write it down, and a few paragraphs turned into this first book in a new series.

 

Kylie Strange has moved to a small Maine town to open a tea and herb shop, and during the shop renovation, she discovers a mysterious book that is older than anyone in town and is completely blank. The locals are more than they seem, there are secrets behind every door, deaths occur in her wake, and Kylie has more than one ‘Being’ interested in her. “Booke of the Hidden” is sexy and funny, with adult themes and situations, with the demons and witches, Wiccans, and assorted other supernatural sorts inhabiting the quaint village. Quick-witted, up-for-everything, crossbow wielding Kylie Strange, is a great new character in the genre.

 

 

Theological Suspense

“Aceldama,” by John Hazen

A coin from the time of Christ is passed through the centuries with dire consequences for its unwitting possessors. A present-day couple faces the wrath of its curse when the husband falls ill. The wife must uncover the reason for his illness before her husband dies – defying logic, the law, and the hierarchy of the Catholic Church.

International connections and supportive friends make “Aceldama” an absorbing read as we discover the identity, power, and meaning of the coin. Several surprises along the way keep the pages turning.

 

 

Non-Fiction

“Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI,” by David Grann.

This award-winning, non-fiction account feels like a novel of suspense. Grann recounts the tragedies that unfolded as members of the Osage Nation in Oklahoma were displaced, swindled, and murdered in a pattern of corruption and greed at the highest levels of government at the beginning of the twentieth century. At the source of it all? Oil fields that lay under lands given to the Osage Nation. Grann researched the court cases and news of the 1890s and early 1900s, includes photos of the stakeholders, and weaves all of the information into a compelling read. While not the only reason for the creation of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Osage cases made an additional convincing argument for the establishment of a national investigative agency.

 

Stretch your reading horizons and try something new this summer.  🙂

 

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Pulitzer Prize – 2017

 

PulitzerPrizeMedal

The Pulitzer Prize is an award given for work published the previous year in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and the arts in the United States. Joseph Pulitzer, an innovative newspaper publisher, endowed Columbia University in New York City with $2 million in his 1904 will. Columbia was to create the School of Journalism, as well as scholarships and prizes to promote excellence in certain fields. The intent of the gift was “for the encouragement of public service, public morals, American literature, and the advancement of education."

 

The President of Columbia has the honor of presenting the yearly awards selected by the Pulitzer Prize board. Pulitzer has evolved over the decades and an expanded prize list now also includes the digital age. The judging is rigorous and to win is considered by many to be the pinnacle in a career.

Click on the titles to read more about each of the books.
 

Fiction 2017

Presented for distinguished fiction published in book form during the previous year by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. Fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).
 

The Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead (Doubleday)

"For a smart melding of realism and allegory that combines the violence of slavery and the drama of escape in a myth that speaks to contemporary America."

Other finalists:

Imagine Me Gone, by Adam Haslett (Little, Brown)

The Sport of Kings, by C. E. Morgan (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

 

General Nonfiction 2017

For a distinguished and appropriately documented book of nonfiction by an American author that is not eligible for consideration in any other category. Fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).
 

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, by Matthew Desmond (Crown)

"For a deeply researched exposé that showed how mass evictions after the 2008 economic crash were less a consequence than a cause of poverty."

Other finalists:

In a Different Key: The Story of Autism, by John Donvan and Caren Zucker (Crown)

The Politics of Mourning: Death and Honor in Arlington National Cemetery, by Micki McElya (Harvard University Press)

 

Congratulations to all for this wonderful achievement.  🙂

 

Please visit www.pulitzer.org for more information and for the list of prizewinners in other disciplines.

 

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The Man Booker Prize International – 2017

 

ManBookerLogo

Famous for its celebration of global fiction, this year’s Man Booker International Prize  competition was among the 13 titles in the longlist below. The £50,000 prize is divided equally between the author of the winning book and its translator. Previously, the prize had been given every other year to an author for an entire body of work. The new version of the Man Book International Prize acknowledges the importance of the quality of a translation in a global publication and is now given annually. The books must have been translated into English and published in the UK.
 

The six titles in the short list group are listed in bold type. The winner is indicated in red.

Click on the book titles to discover more information about the books.
 

Mathias Enard        "Compass"                                     

Translated by Charlotte Mandell
 


Wioletta Greg            "Swallowing Mercury"                 

Translated by Eliza Marciniak

 

David Grossman    "A Horse Walks Into a Bar"  

Translated by Jessica Cohen

 

Stefan Hertmans      "War and Turpentine"                 

Translated by David McKay

 

Roy Jacobsen          "The Unseen"                                 

Translated by Don Bartlett

 

Ismail Kadare           "The Traitor’s Niche"                   

Translated by John Hodgson

 

Yan Lianke               "The Explosion Chronicles"       

Translated by Carlos Rojas

 

Alain Mabanckou       "Black Moses"                          

Translated by Helen Stevenson

 

Clemens Meyer         "Bricks and Mortar"                    

Translated by Katy Derbyshire

 

Dorthe Nors             "Mirror, Shoulder, Signal"          

Translated by Misha Hoekstra

 

Amos Oz                   "Judas"                                          

Translated by Nicholas de Lange

 

Samanta Schweblin     "Fever Dream"                        

Translated by Megan McDowell

 

Jón Kalman Stefánsson   "Fish Have No Feet"        

Translated by Phil Roughton

 

Congratulations to all the nominees and to the winner!  🙂

 

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Anthony Awards 2017 – Bouchercon

 

BoucherconLogoToronto 2017

 

The World Mystery Convention, usually referred to as Bouchercon, is an annual conference named after Anthony Boucher, a mystery author and critic who helped found the Mystery Writers of America. This event honors various segments of the mystery and crime fiction community.

 

The nominees for the Anthony Awards 2017 were chosen by attendees at the 2016 convention, as well as early registrants for the 2017 event. The recognized works were published during 2016 and the winners were  announced on October 15th, after the Sunday Brunch. You’ll notice some returning authors on the list of nominees as well as great new entries.

 

The winners are indicated in red.

 

Best Novel

  • “You Will Know Me” – Megan Abbott
  • “Where It Hurts” – Reed Farrel Coleman
  • “Red Right Hand” – Chris Holm
  • “Wilde Lake” – Laura Lippman
  • “A Great Reckoning” – Louise Penny

 

Best First Novel

  • “Dodgers” – Bill Beverly
  • “IQ” – Joe Ide
  • “Decanting a Murder” – Nadine Nettmann
  • “Design for Dying” – Renee Patrick
  • “The Drifter” – Nicholas Petrie

 

Best Paperback Original

  • “Shot in Detroit” – Patricia Abbott
  • “Leadfoot” – Eric Beetner
  • “Salem’s Cipher” – Jess Lourey
  • “Rain Dogs” – Adrian McKinty
  • “How to Kill Friends and Implicate People” – Jay Stringer
  • “Heart of Stone” – James W. Ziskin  

 

Best Short Story

  • “Oxford Girl” – Megan Abbott, Mississippi Noir
  • “Autumn at the Automat” – Lawrence Block, In Sunlight or in Shadow
  • “Gary’s Got A Boner” – Johnny Shaw, Waiting to Be Forgotten
  • “Parallel Play” – Art Taylor, Chesapeake Crimes: Storm Warning
  • “Queen of the Dogs” – Holly West, 44 Caliber Funk: Tales of Crime, Soul and Payback

 

Best Anthology

  • “Unloaded: Crime Writers Writing Without Guns” – Eric Beetner, ed.
  • “In Sunlight or in Shadow” – Lawrence Block, ed.
  • “Cannibals: Stories from the Edge of the Pine Barrens” – Jen Conley
  • “Blood on the Bayou: Bouchercon Anthology 2016” – Greg Herren, ed.
  • “Waiting To Be Forgotten: Stories of Crime and Heartbreak, Inspired by the Replacements” – Jay Stringer, ed.

 

For nominees & winners in the YA, Critical Non-Fiction, and Novella categories, please visit http://bouchercon2017.com/anthony-awards/

 

Congratulations to all the Anthony Awards-2017 nominees and winners!  🙂

 

Previous winners include:

2016:

BEST NOVEL – “The Killing Kind” – Chris Holm   

BEST FIRST NOVEL – “Past Crimes” – Glen Erik Hamilton 

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL – “The Long and Faraway Gone” – Lou Berney 

BEST SHORT STORY – "The Little Men: A Bibliomystery" – Megan Abbott 

 

2015:

BEST NOVEL“After I'm Gone” – Laura Lippman

BEST FIRST NOVEL – “The Black Hour” – Lori Rader-Day

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL – “The Day She Died” – Catriona McPherson

BEST SHORT STORY – "The Odds Are Against Us" Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, Nov 2014 – Art Taylor

 

2014:

BEST FIRST NOVEL – Matt Coyle’s “Yesterday's Echo”

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL – Catriona McPherson’s “As She Left It”

BEST NOVEL – William Kent Krueger’s “Ordinary Grace”

 

 

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