Non-fiction

Killer Nashville Silver Falchion Awards – 2018

 

Killer Nashville is one of the most popular conferences in the country for writers and readers and is held each year in the Nashville, Tennessee area. Established by writer and filmmaker Clay Stafford in 2006, the conference assists authors in the craft of mystery, thriller, suspense, and crime fiction writing. Stafford and American Blackguard, Inc. also work to further various literacy programs throughout the year.

 

As a part of both encouraging and rewarding writers in their varied fields, the Killer Nashville Silver Falchion Awards are given to authors and their outstanding books published in the previous year. This year, the awards were presented on August 25th at the Killer Nashville Awards Banquet. The finalists and winners (noted in red) are:

 

Best Overall Novel

Dana Chamblee Carpenter  "The Devil's Bible"

 

Best Action Adventure

Baron Birtcher  “South California Purples”

Howard Hammerman  “Flying Blind”

Margaret Mizushima  “Hunting Hour”

Linda Sands  “Grand Theft Cargo”

Jeffrey Wilson  “War Shadows”

 

Best Cozy Mystery

Catherine Bruns  “Frosted with Revenge”

Julie Chase  “Cat Got Your Secrets”

Christopher Greyson  “Jack of Hearts”

Lynn Hesse  “Another Kind of Hero”

Terry John Malik  “The Bricklayer of Albany Park”

Larissa Reinhart  “16 Millimeters”

Lori Robbins  “Lesson Plan for Murder”

Tricia L. Sanders  “Murder is a Dirty Business”

Colleen Shogun  “Calamity at the Continental Club”

Carol L. Wright  “Death in Glenville Falls”

 

Best Mystery

Robert Dugoni  “The Trapped Girl”

Steven Harms  “Give Place to Wrath”

Michael Rubin  “Cashed Out”

Carrie Smith  “Unholy City”

Joseph Terrell  “The Last Blue Noon in May”

 

Best Non-Fiction

Mattias Bostrom  “From Holmes to Sherlock”

Shayla McBride  “A is for Author”

Mike Pettit  “Raised by Wolves”

Bryan Robinson  “Daily Writing Resilience”

 

Best Procedural

Carmen Amato  “43 Missing”

Steven Cooper  “Desert Remains”

Caroline Fardig  “Bitter Past”

Mike Faricy  “The Office”

Henry Hack  “Forever Young”

Roger Johns  “Dark River Rising”

James L’Etoile  “Bury the Past”

Marla Madison  “The Way She Lied”

Caroline Mitchell  “Murder Game”

James Paavola  “The Unspeakable”

 

Best Suspense

Ken Bruen  “Ghosts of Galway”

Paula Daly  “The Trophy Child”

Deb Gaskill  “Kissing Fitz”

L.C. Hayden ”What Lies Beneath the Fence”

Tikiri Herath  “Disowned”

Linda Hughes  “Secrets of the Asylum”

Jessica James  “Frontline”

John Lawton  “Friends and Traitors”

Amanda McKinney  “The Storm: A Berry Springs Novel”

Kelly Oliver  “Fox: A Jessica James Mystery”

 

Best Thriller

Linwood Barclay  “Parting Shot”

Robin Barefield  “The Fisherman’s Daughter”

Roxanne Caine  “Stillhouse Lake”

Kim Carter  “Murder Among the Tombstones”

Susan Elia MacNeal  “The Paris Spy”

Shirley B. Garrett  “Deadly Lessons”

Christopher Greyson  “The Girl Who Lived”

Carolyn Haines  “The Specter of Seduction”

Charles Kowalski  “Mind Virus”

Kathryn Lane  “Coyote Zone”

 

Please visit https://killernashville.com/2018-killer-nashville-awards-winners/ for  finalists and winners in the YA, SciFi/Fantasy/Horror, and Short Story categories, as well as the additional awards of Claymore Awards, Reader's Choice Award, C. Auguste Dupin Detective Award, and John Siegenthaler Legends Award.  Congratulations to all!

 

 

 

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Try Something New This Summer

 

Every once in a while, avid readers take a break from their favorite genre and venture into ‘summer reading,’ where the world is either a warm, happy, safe place, or the mishaps that occur are slapstick funny and somebody always has your back. No world crises, no exploding planets, just stories that bring a smile to your face.
 


A few of us indulge our curiosity about demons and witches – as long as the hero/heroines are owners of tea and herb shops, that is.


Then there are the ancient curses that awaken and wreak havoc upon those that get in the way.


If you are primarily a fan of fiction as I am, a foray into the realm of serious non-fiction most often occurs when a compelling true story crosses our paths.


Take a look at the suggestions below and try something a bit different this season.


Happily Ever After

“Sand Dollar Cove,” by Nancy Naigle, is the completely delightful story of a beach area recently hit by bad weather, with people working together to rebuild it. The town relies on tourism to stay afloat, so one of the business owners organizes a fundraising event. We must suspend our disbelief while the rapidly approaching deadline looms to get the work done, but the lead characters are so endearing that we want them to be super human, have their wishes come true, and save the pier. Just in time for summer reading, “Sand Dollar Cove” includes a budding romance between a stranger and our heroine, and the almost magical sand dollars. This could easily fit into the Hallmark Channel lineup of happily ever after stories.


P.I. for Dummies

“Choke,” by Kaye George

Imogene Duckworthy wants to become a private eye, but has no training whatsoever. She gets a book – “P.I. for Dummies,” and has business cards made. Our  hapless heroine feels that she is qualified to ‘detect’ because she found a neighbor’s missing puppy. How hard could it be?

 

This high school graduate, an unwed mother, works for her Uncle at his diner, and when he is found dead, she tries to solve the case. Duckworthy is too naïve to recognize the crooks right in front of her and swoons at the sight of long legs and a smile. Me, oh, my, this gal is in trouble. She is in and out of jail, escapes from cops who are not after her and sees disasters and threats where none exist.

 

“Choke” is a comedy read that takes nothing seriously in solving a mystery – except the lead character herself. What in the world could go wrong? (First book in the series by Agatha nominated, Kaye George) Set near the Oklahoma border, people familiar with the North Texas area will recognize a certain town with fake falls in ‘Wymee Falls.’

 

 

 

Witches, Demons, Wiccans, and ordinary folk

“Booke of the Hidden,” by award-winning author Jeri Westerson, came to Jeri in a dream. Known for her medieval mysteries, her dream was so compelling that she had to write it down, and a few paragraphs turned into this first book in a new series.

 

Kylie Strange has moved to a small Maine town to open a tea and herb shop, and during the shop renovation, she discovers a mysterious book that is older than anyone in town and is completely blank. The locals are more than they seem, there are secrets behind every door, deaths occur in her wake, and Kylie has more than one ‘Being’ interested in her. “Booke of the Hidden” is sexy and funny, with adult themes and situations, with the demons and witches, Wiccans, and assorted other supernatural sorts inhabiting the quaint village. Quick-witted, up-for-everything, crossbow wielding Kylie Strange, is a great new character in the genre.

 

 

Theological Suspense

“Aceldama,” by John Hazen

A coin from the time of Christ is passed through the centuries with dire consequences for its unwitting possessors. A present-day couple faces the wrath of its curse when the husband falls ill. The wife must uncover the reason for his illness before her husband dies – defying logic, the law, and the hierarchy of the Catholic Church.

International connections and supportive friends make “Aceldama” an absorbing read as we discover the identity, power, and meaning of the coin. Several surprises along the way keep the pages turning.

 

 

Non-Fiction

“Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI,” by David Grann.

This award-winning, non-fiction account feels like a novel of suspense. Grann recounts the tragedies that unfolded as members of the Osage Nation in Oklahoma were displaced, swindled, and murdered in a pattern of corruption and greed at the highest levels of government at the beginning of the twentieth century. At the source of it all? Oil fields that lay under lands given to the Osage Nation. Grann researched the court cases and news of the 1890s and early 1900s, includes photos of the stakeholders, and weaves all of the information into a compelling read. While not the only reason for the creation of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Osage cases made an additional convincing argument for the establishment of a national investigative agency.

 

Stretch your reading horizons and try something new this summer.  🙂

 

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Military Fiction and Non-fiction

 

 

As we approach Memorial Day in the United States, I am reminded of the many friends and family members affected by war and its fallout, but rarely do veterans talk about their experiences. The authors below have captured the challenges and realities soldiers have faced throughout history. If you read Military Fiction and Non-fiction, these are among the best.

 

Mark Bowden: “Black Hawk Down,” true story of American forces in Somalia.
 

Philip Caputo: "A Rumor of War," the riveting true story of Philip Caputo's experience in Viet Nam.
 

Tom Clancy: “The Hunt for Red October,” based on a story rumored to be true.
 

Stephen Coonts: “Flight of the Intruder,” gripping story of Navy carrier pilot during Viet Nam, based on Coonts’ experiences.
 

Bernard Cornwell: “Sharpe’s Rifles,” part of a fictional series about Napoleonic warfare.

 

Nelson DeMille: “Up Country,” one of DeMille’s best. My review can be read here.

 

Ken Follett: “The Eye of the Needle,” Edgar Award winner.

 

Christopher Hibbert: “Red Coats and Rebels,” American Revolution told from the British perspective.

 

Laura Hillenbrand: “Unbroken,” WW2 true story of resilience, review here.

 

John Keegan: “The Face of Battle,” the story of what real soldiers go through, with information about famous battles in history.

 

Phil Klay: “Redeployment,” award-winning book contains 12 short stories centered around deployment in Afghanistan & Iraq.
 

Marcus Luttrell: “Lone Survivor: Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10.”

 

Tim O'Brien: "The Things They Carried," award-winning book of the Viet Nam conflict.

 

Thank a veteran. Give him/her a job. They sacrificed much and fought to keep you free.

 

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Anthony Awards 2018 – Bouchercon

 

The Anthony Awards 2018 were handed out at The World Mystery Convention (usually referred to as Bouchercon) on September 8, 2018. Bouchercon is an annual conference named after Anthony Boucher, a mystery author and critic who helped found the Mystery Writers of America. This event honors various segments of the mystery and crime fiction community.
 

The nominees for the Anthony Awards 2018 were chosen by attendees at the 2017 convention, as well as early registrants for the 2018 event. The recognized works were published during 2017 and the finalists were voted upon by the 2018 Bouchercon attendees. The winners were announced that weekend. Congratulations to all the nominees and winners! Winners indicated in red.  🙂
 

Nominees and winners for the Anthony Awards 2018 are:

BEST NOVEL

  • "The Late Show" by Michael Connelly
  • "Magpie Murders" by Anthony Horowitz
  • "Bluebird, Bluebird" by Attica Locke
  • "Glass Houses" by Louise Penny
  • "The Force" by Don Winslow

BEST FIRST NOVEL

  • "Hollywood Homicide" by Kellye Garrett
  • "She Rides Shotgun" by Jordan Harper
  • "The Dry" by Jane Harper
  • "Ragged; or, The Loveliest Lies of All" by Christopher Irvin
  • "The Last Place You Look" by Kristen Lepionka

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

  • "Uncorking a Lie" by Nadine Nettmann
  • "Bad Boy Boogie" by Thomas Pluck
  • "What We Reckon" by Eryk Pruitt
  • "The Day I Died" by Lori Rader-Day
  • "Cast the First Stone" by James W. Ziskin

BILL CRIDER AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL IN A SERIES  

  • "Give Up the Dead" (Jay Porter #3) by Joe Clifford
  • "Two Kinds of Truth" (Harry Bosch #20) by Michael Connelly
  • "Y is for Yesterday" (Kinsey Millhone #25) by Sue Grafton
  • "Glass Houses" (Armand Gamache #13) by Louise Penny
  • "Dangerous Ends" (Pete Fernandez #3) by Alex Segura

BEST SHORT STORY

  • "The Trial of Madame Pelletier" by Susanna Calkins from Malice Domestic 12: Mystery Most Historical
  • "God’s Gonna Cut You Down" by Jen Conley from Just to Watch Them Die: Crime Fiction Inspired by the Songs of Johnny Cash
  • "My Side of the Matter" by Hilary Davidson from Killing Malmon
  • "Whose Wine Is It Anyway?" by Barb Goffman from 50 Shades of Cabernet
  • "The Night They Burned Miss Dixie’s Place" by Debra Goldstein from Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, May/June 2017
  • "A Necessary Ingredient" by Art Taylor from Coast to Coast: Private Eyes from Sea to Shining Sea

BEST CRITICAL/NON-FICTION BOOK 

  • "From Holmes to Sherlock: The Story of the Men and Women Who Created an Icon" by Mattias Boström
  • "The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books" by Martin Edwards
  • "Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI" by David Grann
  • "Chester B. Himes: A Biography" by Lawrence P. Jackson
  • "Rewrite Your Life: Discover Your Truth Through the Healing Power of Fiction" by Jessica Lourey

 

 

Please visit https://www.bouchercon2018.com/anthony-awards/ for nominees/winners in the Best Online Content and Best Anthology categories.

 

Happy Reading!  🙂

 

 

 

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The Edgar Awards – 2018

 

Edgar Statues

Each year, the Mystery Writers of America honors the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, and television, published or produced the previous year. This year, on the 209th anniversary of the birth of Edgar Allan Poe, the winners of The Edgar Awards – 2018 were announced at the Gala Banquet held in New York City, on April 26, 2018.

 

Here are the nominees (and winners indicated in red) for the prestigious Edgars:

 

 

BEST NOVEL

“The Dime” by Kathleen Kent

“Prussian Blue” by Philip Kerr

“Bluebird, Bluebird” by Attica Locke

“A Rising Man” by Abir Mukherjee

“The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley” by Hannah Tinti

 

 

BEST FIRST NOVEL BY AN AMERICAN AUTHOR

“She Rides Shotgun” by Jordan Harper

“Dark Chapter” by Winnie M. Li

“Lola” by Melissa Scrivner Love

“Tornado Weather” by Deborah E. Kennedy

“Idaho” by Emily Ruskovich

 

 

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL

“In Farleigh Field” by Rhys Bowen

“Ragged Lake” by Ron Corbett

“Black Fall” by Andrew Mayne

“The Unseeing” by Anna Mazzola

“Penance” by Kanae Minato

“The Rules of Backyard Cricket” by Jock Serong

 

 

BEST FACT CRIME

“Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI” by David Grann

“The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple” by Jeff Guinn

“American Fire: Love, Arson, and Life in a Vanishing Land” by Monica Hesse

“The Man From the Train: The Solving of a Century-Old Serial Killer Mystery” by Bill and Rachel McCarthy James

“Mrs. Sherlock Holmes: The True Story of New York City's Greatest Female Detective and the 1917 Missing Girl Case that Captivated a Nation” by Brad Ricca

 

 

BEST SHORT STORY

“Spring Break” – New Haven Noir by John Crowley

“Hard to Get” – Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine by Jeffery Deaver

“Ace in the Hole” – Montana Noir by Eric Heidle

“A Moment of Clarity at the Waffle House” – Atlanta Noir by Kenji Jasper

“Chin Yong-Yun Stays at Home” – Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine by S.J. Rozan

 

 

BEST YOUNG ADULT

“The Cruelty” by Scott Bergstrom

“Grit” by Gillian French

“The Impossible Fortress” by Jason Rekulak

“Long Way Down” by Jason Reynolds

“The Hate U Give” by Angie Thomas

 

 

For nominees and winners in the categories of BEST CRITICAL/BIOGRAPHICAL, BEST JUVENILE, BEST TELEVISION TELEPLAY, as well as the recipients of specialty awards, please visit www.theedgars.com/nominees

 

MWA logo

 

Congratulations to all The Edgar Awards – 2018 nominees and winners!  Happy reading.  🙂

 

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Cookbooks by Famous Authors – 2017

 

Book Cover - The Cozy Cookbook

What great cook can resist a great new cookbook?

Even better, what foodie/avid reader can resist a cookbook created by his/her favorite author?

 

The following fifteen cookbooks have been recommended by the readers of Nightstand Book Reviews as part of their literary and/or cookbook collections. The cookbooks would definitely make a fun gift to a fan of any of the authors. There are some pretty famous writers in the mix and many of the cookbooks have been nominated for awards.   🙂   If you have tried any of the recipes, please let us know in the comments.

 

Click on the book title to learn more about the featured recipes and where to buy the books.

 

 

"Brunetti's Cookbook" – Roberta Pianaro, Donna Leon

 

 

Cooking with Jane Austen”   – Kirstin Olsen

 

 

"Food to Die For"  – Patricia Cornwell, Marlene Brown

 

 

"Goldy's Kitchen Cookbook"  – Diane Mott Davidson

 

 

"Have Faith In Your Kitchen" – Katherine Hall Page

 

 

Jan Karon’s Mitford Cookbook and Kitchen Reader” – Jan Karon

 


“KP Authors Cook Their Books” – 11 Kindle Press Authors

 

 

Mma Ramotswe's Cookbook” – Stuart Brown, forward by Alexander McCall Smith

 

 

"Mystery Writers of America Cookbook" – Kate White, editor; famous mystery writer contributors

 

 

The Cat Who Cookbook” – Lilian Jackson Braun

 

 

"The Cozy Cookbook"  – Laura Childs & other bestselling cozy writers

 

 

"The Hemingway Cookbook" – Craig Boreth

 

 

"The Outlander Kitchen: The Official Outlander Companion Cookbook" – Theresa Carle-Sanders

 

 

Yashim Cooks Istanbul: Culinary Adventures in the Ottoman Kitchen – Jason Goodwin

 

 

"Winnie the Pooh’s Teatime Cookbook" – A.A. Milne

 

 

Happy holiday cooking with these cookbooks by famous authors!  🙂

 

 

                      

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National Book Awards – 2017

 

NationalBookFoundationLogo

“The mission of the National Book Foundation and the National Book Awards is to celebrate the best of American literature, to expand its audience, and to enhance the cultural value of great writing in America.” *
 

The National Book Award is an American literary prize administered by the National Book Foundation. There are twenty judges for the competition, five in each of the categories: Fiction, Non-Fiction, Poetry and Young People’s Literature. The judges are a mix of writers, librarians and booksellers. This year, American publishers submitted books published between December 1, 2016 and November 30, 2017, written by American authors. The winners were announced on November 15, 2017. Each Winner received a prize of $10,000. Each Finalist received a prize of $1,000. 

 

The winners are indicated in red. Click on the authors’ names to discover information about the book.


Fiction:

Jesmyn Ward, Sing, Unburied, Sing

Elliot Ackerman, Dark at the Crossing

Lisa Ko, The Leavers

Min Jin Lee, Pachinko

Carmen Maria Machado, Her Body and Other Parties: Stories

 

Non-Fiction:

Masha Gessen, The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia

Erica Armstrong Dunbar, Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge

Frances FitzGerald, The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America

David Grann, Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

Nancy MacLean, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America

 


Poetry:

Frank Bidart, Half-light: Collected Poems 1965-2016

Leslie Harrison, The Book of Endings  

Layli Long Soldier, WHEREAS

Shane McCrae, In the Language of My Captor

Danez Smith, Don’t Call Us Dead: Poems

 

Young People’s Literature:

Robin Benway, Far from the Tree

Elana K. Arnold, What Girls Are Made Of

Erika L. Sánchez, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter

Rita Williams-Garcia, Clayton Byrd Goes Underground

Ibi Zoboi, American Street

 

Congratulations to all the finalists and winners of the National Book Awards – 2017!    🙂

 

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