Mystery

Goodreads Choice Awards – 2018

 

Most of the winners of major book awards are selected by members of the groups that give the award – much like the film industry’s Academy Awards are selected each year. Mystery writers and fans vote on the major mystery awards; romance writers vote on the Rita Award, etc.

 

Goodreads, the popular readers/authors site, has a slightly different model for the Goodreads Choice Awards. During the year, readers chat about books they’re reading and make lists of their favorites for their friends and followers to see. They also rank books they’ve read with stars, indicating how much they liked (or disliked) the titles published that year. There are thousands of books listed on the site, with thousands of comments, giving anyone who’s interested a way to see how a book (published in the U.S. in English) is viewed by the Goodreads group. Amazon acquired Goodreads, so these reviews and stars probably have an impact on book sales.

 

During October each year, the Goodreads staff looks at the stats and does the math, then nominates 15 books for each of 20 categories that have an average rating of 3.5 stars or more. During the first round, write-ins are allowed, so check to see if your fave made the cut. (There is a special 21st category this year – the Best of the Best)

 

The members of the Goodreads community vote in elimination rounds. They are allowed to vote in all twenty-one categories, giving a broader view of a book’s popularity. If you sign up to become a member of Goodreads, you can vote as well.


Voting Schedule:

Opening round is closed: Oct. 30th thru Nov. 4th   (voting on the selected 15 in each category, write-ins accepted)

 

Semifinal Round is now open: Nov. 6th thru Nov. 11th  (voting on the original 15 along with the top 5 write-ins in each category – voters can change their minds about the original vote)

 

Final Round to come: Nov. 13th thru Nov. 26th  (voting on final top 10 books in each category)


Winners announced:  Dec. 4th.

 

Here are the 2018 voting links for nine of the categories (once there, the other twelve categories are an easy click away):

Fiction

Mystery & Thriller

Historical Fiction

Fantasy

Romance

Science Fiction

Non-Fiction

YA Fantasy & Science Fiction

Best of the Best   (New this year, in honor of the 10th anniversary of the Choice Awards)

 

The 2017 Goodreads Choice Awards went to:

Fiction: Celeste Ng  “Little Fires Everywhere”

Mystery & Thriller: Paula Hawkins  “Into the Water”

Historical Fiction: Lisa Wingate  “Before We Were Yours”

Fantasy: JK Rowling  “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”

Romance: Colleen Hoover  “Without Merit”

Science Fiction: Andy Weir  “Artemis”

Non-Fiction: Lilly Singh  “How to Be a Bawse”

YA Fantasy & Science Fiction: Sarah J. Maas  “A Court of Wings and Ruin”

 

Did you read any of the winning choices from 2017? If so, what did you think? Let us know in the comment section.

 

The 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards went to:

Fiction: Liane Moriarty “Truly Madly Guilty”

Mystery & Thriller: Stephen King  “End of Watch”

Historical Fiction: Colson Whitehead “The Underground Railroad”

Fantasy: J.K. Rowling “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”

Romance: Colleen Hoover  “It Ends With Us”

Science Fiction: Pierce Brown  “Morning Star”

Non-Fiction: Lin-Manuel Miranda, Jeremy Carter “Hamilton: The Revolution”

YA Fantasy & Science Fiction: Sarah J. Maas  “Court of Mist and Fury”

 

 

The 12 additional categories included cookbooks, horror, non-fiction, children’s books and more.

 

This is the tenth anniversary of this groundbreaking international event, with increased participation each year.
The final tabulation for 2015 was 3,007,748 votes.

In 2016?  3,550,346 votes. 
2017?  3,887,950   🙂

 

Happy reading & voting!  🙂 

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!

“43 Missing” by Carmen Amato

 

In “43 Missing,” Detective Emilia Cruz, the first woman detective in Acapulco, has been called in on a federal level case – a search for the missing bodies of 43 male college students who participated in an annual protest rally. After stealing busses from a local bus company, they were stopped by the police, handed over to a drug gang, and never seen again.


Cruz is part of a task force of five law enforcement officers hand-picked by the Attorney General’s office because of their lack of affiliation with any previous inquiries or associations with the families. Their parameters are clear: ‘Don’t gather new evidence or interview the families, but the government wants to confirm or deny the conclusions of the previous investigations and put the matter to rest.’


"43 Missing" is based on an actual 2014 case in Mexico. It garnered quite a bit of international attention and was thought at the time to be gang/drug related. Nobody, not even the Mexican government, disputed that. 


In Amato's fictional account, the families want closure. They know the boys are dead, but they have to find where the bodies were buried. It's been a year and a half and the families feel corruption is getting in the way of the truth. They don't want to point fingers or cast blame because they fear for their lives if they do speak up. In “43 Missing,” several previous investigations conducted by various agencies pointed to inadequate actions by the Mexican government, and nothing was done to either bring anyone to justice or to find the bodies.


Emilia agrees to participate because of the connection to an old, intensely personal case. She may be able to find the person, her own brother, against whom she must exact revenge. So far, she has risked everything – friends, an important relationship, her job; now maybe her life.


What is uncovered in "43 Missing" is astounding. Amato is thoroughly convincing in her version of what might have happened in real life. The two cases of the missing boys and Cruz' search for personal revenge overlap in complex and frightening ways. This is a haunting page-turner.


Amato's books are set in Mexico, with vivid images of the country's landscape and unique architecture, both old and new. She includes descriptions of the meals eaten in street-side cafes and great restaurants, reminding me how much I love Mexican food.


Taut writing ramps up the tension in “43 Missing,” as Amato deals with the issues plaguing any two countries battling the drug trade and human trafficking along their borders. The tragedy of decent members of society caught in the crossfire, stayed with me long after I finished the book. 


In real-life, the 43 bodies have yet to be found.


“43 Missing,” nominated for Killer Nashville’s Silver Falchion award, is book #6 in the Detective Emilia Cruz series. Please visit http://carmenamato.net/ for more information about Ms. Amato’s distinguished law enforcement background and the other books in the series.

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!

Halloween Mystery List – 2018

 

Halloween will be here before you know it and if you’d like to pick up a fun read with a seasonal theme, here are fifty-eight titles in our updated 2018 Halloween Mystery List.

 

Some have been around for ages, but others have recently been published or re-published. There are dozens more books with a Halloween theme, so if your favorite is not on the list, please let us know the title and author in the comments.

Click on the bold titles to read more about the individual books.

 

Stacey Alabaster – The Pumpkin Killer

Susan Wittig Albert – Witches' Bane

Ritter Ames and 8 others – Midnight Mysteries: Nine Cozy Tales

Gretchen Archer – Double Jinx

Susan Bernhardt – The Ginseng Conspiracy

Bethany Blake – Dial Meow for Murder

Susan Boles – Death of a Wolfman

Lilian Jackson Braun – Cat Who Talked to Ghosts

Allison Brook – Death Overdue

Rita Mae Brown – The Litter of the Law

Mollie Cox Bryan – Scrapbook of the Dead

Anna Celeste Burke – All Hallows’ Eve Heist

Jessica Burton – Death Goes Shopping

Nora Charles – Death with an Ocean View

Laura Childs – Frill Kill

Agatha Christie – The Hallowe'en Party

Susan Rogers Cooper – Not in My Backyard

E.J. Copperman – Night of the Living Deed

Kathy Cranston – Pumpkins are Murder

Isis Crawford – A Catered Costume Party

Kathi Daley – Henderson House

Jana Deleon – Swamp Spook

Steve Demaree – Murder on Halloween

Carole Nelson Douglas – Cat with an Emerald Eye

Janet Evanovich – Plum Spooky

Connie Feddersen – Dead in the Pumpkin Patch

Vickie Fee – It’s Your Party, Die If You Want To

Honora Finkelstein – The Lawyer Who Died Trying

‘Jessica Fletcher’ & Donald Bain – Trick or Treachery

Eva Gates – The Spook in the Stacks

Daryl Wood Gerber (aka Avery Aames) – Stirring the Plot

Sarah Graves – Nail Biter

Carolyn Haines – Hallowed Bones

Ellen Hart – Sweet Poison

Lee Hollis – Death of a Pumpkin Carver

Carolyn Q. Hunter – Pumpkin Pie Waffle

Ellen Elizabeth Hunter – Murder on the Ghost Walk

Sybil Johnson – Designed for Haunting

Daniel Judson – The Violet Hour

Heather Justesen – Muffins & Murder

Andrew Klavan – The Animal Hour

Cynthia Kuhn – The Spirit in Question

Joyce & Jim Lavene – Ghastly Glass

James Lilley – Death Knocks Twice

Linda Lovely – Picked Off

Alice Loweecey – The Clock Strikes Nun

Karen MacInerney – Deadly Brew

Ed McBain – Tricks: an 87th Precinct Mystery

Jenn McKinlay – Dark Chocolate Demise

G.A. McKevett – Poisoned Tarts

Leslie Meier – Wicked Witch Murder

Mandy Morton – Cat Among the Pumpkins

Liz Mugavero – A Biscuit, a Casket

Julie Mulhern – Send in the Clowns

Katie Penryn – The Witch Who Hated Halloween

Leigh Perry – The Skeleton Haunts a House

Rebecca Tope – Death in the Cotswolds

Diane Vallere – Masking for Trouble

 

If you’ve read any books in the Halloween Mystery List for 2018, please let us know what you thought.

 

Happy Spooky reading.   🙂

 

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!

“The Code” and “The Black Ace” by G.B. Joyce

 

“The Code” and “The Black Ace” written by award-winning Canadian sportswriter G. B. Joyce, are set in the world of professional hockey. Former pro hockey player, Brad Shade, worked as an investigator for four years post-hockey, but is now an assessor scout for a hockey team based in the States. He interviews junior league prospects and their families, watches them play, and analyzes why they would or would not fit into the franchise. Millions of dollars are at stake and kids that do well in junior hockey might not have what it takes mentally or physically to make a career of it.
 

 

During a scouting trip, Shade has trouble arranging a meet with one of the prospects. In the course of tracking him down, Shade uncovers some disturbing information, a major coverup seems likely, the prospect’s teammate goes missing, and people wind up dead. And Shade gets a chance to apply his P.I. investigative skills to his present scouting gig.

 

“The Code” shows the underbelly of the junior hockey leagues, highlighting the greed and money to be made. Sadly, in any big money sport with youth being fed into the majors, there are parents that chase the dream without regard for what the kids want. And as G.B. Joyce points out, unless there is a real hunger/enthusiasm for the game (not for the fame or money alone), it’s unlikely that even a talented player will have much staying power.

 

A Canadian TV show, “Private Eyes,” is currently being broadcast in the USA. The show is fun and when I discovered that it was based on Joyce’s books, I picked up “The Code,” and soon after, “The Black Ace.” The similarity between the books and the TV show end with the game of hockey and Shade’s stint as a P.I.  Even our hero’s name has been changed to Matt in the TV show. Both versions are good; Shade’s investigations are dogged in both, but on TV he's a full time P.I. and in “The Code” any investigation is tied to the game and his job as a scout.

 

I love the game of hockey in its purest form, so while there is a mystery to be solved in “The Code,” reading this as a sports book was a distinct pleasure. I saw several episodes of the show before picking up the books, and each brings something new to my understanding of both P.I. work and the game of hockey.
 

 

“The Black Ace” is the second book in this hockey/detective series.

Shade is now the official scouting director for the L.A. team, but still spends a lot of time on the road checking out prospects in the junior leagues. 
 

He learns that former teammate and roommate, Martin Mars, has died and that his death has been classified as a suicide. Shade and "Whisper" played together in a history making, five overtime game. On behalf of the franchise, he and a colleague, Chief, attend the funeral. When Shade and Chief pay their respects, the widow shares her doubts that her husband could have committed suicide and asks Shade to look into it. 
 

Shade can’t say no, but Chief has a bad feeling about the situation. Before long, they are beaten up, jailed, threatened, and no closer to the truth. The mystery is why anybody would care enough about their presence to harass them. Shade is not intimidated, won’t leave town because of his promise to the widow, and the threats blow back on the bad guys. He and Chief do some digging, uncover Mars’ shocking past, as well as a mega bucks deal that may be the reason Mars is dead.
 

Shade had attitude on the ice and his off-ice personality hasn't changed. His view of the world is a tad snarky, but he’s entitled. Shade’s manager blew his millions on a shady real estate deal and Shade’s ACL was shredded by an opponent he never liked. But that snarky veneer shows cracks when faced with a good person who needs help and when guilt for his own actions in the past come skating into the present.
 

As Joyce walks us through the process of choosing the next Wayne Gretzky or Martin Brodeur, we learn what kinds of deals need to be made to protect the players and/or the front office. Both books contain lots of tidbits about the life of a hockey player. Did you know that the players fly first class because the seats are bigger/wider? Most of the players have well developed thighs and shoulders and they simply can’t fit into the seats in economy. And here I thought they were just after the special drinks and snacks only available up front.
 

Shade is a complex character, nicely layered with references to the impact life on the road has on his personal relationships. He’s upfront about the career ending injuries he and other players have sustained and knows full well that he was not a gifted player, just a very smart one with a genuine love of the game.

 

According to the online booksellers, “The Code” and “The Black Ace” are followed by “The Third Man In,” rounding out the Brad Shade series. It’s on my ’to buy’ list.

 

Please visit    https://www.penguinrandomhouse.ca/authors/14875/gare-joyce   to learn more about G.B. Joyce (Gare Joyce for non-fiction) and his books.

 

 

 

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!

McIlvanney Prize: Scotland Crime Book of the Year – 2018

 

Bloody Scotland 2018

 

The Scotland Crime Book of the Year Award, now called The McIlvanney Prize, is given at Bloody Scotland, a premier conference for crime writers. Eligible authors must be born in Scotland, live there, or set their books there. The winner receives 1,000 pounds and the book is promoted for a year by a major bookstore chain in Great Britain. Links to books included. The winner is indicated in red.

 

2018 Finalists

Lin Anderson, “Follow the Dead


Chris Brookmyre, “Places in the Darkness


Charles Cumming, “The Man Between


Liam McIlvanney, “The Quaker

 

Congratulations to all the finalists and to the winner!  🙂

 

Previous winners are noted below:

2017: Denise Mina – “The Long Drop”

2016: Chris Brookmyre – “Black Widow”

2015: Craig Russell – “The Ghosts of Altona”

2014: Peter May – “Entry Island”

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!

Killer Nashville Silver Falchion Awards – 2018

 

Killer Nashville is one of the most popular conferences in the country for writers and readers and is held each year in the Nashville, Tennessee area. Established by writer and filmmaker Clay Stafford in 2006, the conference assists authors in the craft of mystery, thriller, suspense, and crime fiction writing. Stafford and American Blackguard, Inc. also work to further various literacy programs throughout the year.

 

As a part of both encouraging and rewarding writers in their varied fields, the Killer Nashville Silver Falchion Awards are given to authors and their outstanding books published in the previous year. This year, the awards were presented on August 25th at the Killer Nashville Awards Banquet. The finalists and winners (noted in red) are:

 

Best Overall Novel

Dana Chamblee Carpenter  "The Devil's Bible"

 

Best Action Adventure

Baron Birtcher  “South California Purples”

Howard Hammerman  “Flying Blind”

Margaret Mizushima  “Hunting Hour”

Linda Sands  “Grand Theft Cargo”

Jeffrey Wilson  “War Shadows”

 

Best Cozy Mystery

Catherine Bruns  “Frosted with Revenge”

Julie Chase  “Cat Got Your Secrets”

Christopher Greyson  “Jack of Hearts”

Lynn Hesse  “Another Kind of Hero”

Terry John Malik  “The Bricklayer of Albany Park”

Larissa Reinhart  “16 Millimeters”

Lori Robbins  “Lesson Plan for Murder”

Tricia L. Sanders  “Murder is a Dirty Business”

Colleen Shogun  “Calamity at the Continental Club”

Carol L. Wright  “Death in Glenville Falls”

 

Best Mystery

Robert Dugoni  “The Trapped Girl”

Steven Harms  “Give Place to Wrath”

Michael Rubin  “Cashed Out”

Carrie Smith  “Unholy City”

Joseph Terrell  “The Last Blue Noon in May”

 

Best Non-Fiction

Mattias Bostrom  “From Holmes to Sherlock”

Shayla McBride  “A is for Author”

Mike Pettit  “Raised by Wolves”

Bryan Robinson  “Daily Writing Resilience”

 

Best Procedural

Carmen Amato  “43 Missing”

Steven Cooper  “Desert Remains”

Caroline Fardig  “Bitter Past”

Mike Faricy  “The Office”

Henry Hack  “Forever Young”

Roger Johns  “Dark River Rising”

James L’Etoile  “Bury the Past”

Marla Madison  “The Way She Lied”

Caroline Mitchell  “Murder Game”

James Paavola  “The Unspeakable”

 

Best Suspense

Ken Bruen  “Ghosts of Galway”

Paula Daly  “The Trophy Child”

Deb Gaskill  “Kissing Fitz”

L.C. Hayden ”What Lies Beneath the Fence”

Tikiri Herath  “Disowned”

Linda Hughes  “Secrets of the Asylum”

Jessica James  “Frontline”

John Lawton  “Friends and Traitors”

Amanda McKinney  “The Storm: A Berry Springs Novel”

Kelly Oliver  “Fox: A Jessica James Mystery”

 

Best Thriller

Linwood Barclay  “Parting Shot”

Robin Barefield  “The Fisherman’s Daughter”

Roxanne Caine  “Stillhouse Lake”

Kim Carter  “Murder Among the Tombstones”

Susan Elia MacNeal  “The Paris Spy”

Shirley B. Garrett  “Deadly Lessons”

Christopher Greyson  “The Girl Who Lived”

Carolyn Haines  “The Specter of Seduction”

Charles Kowalski  “Mind Virus”

Kathryn Lane  “Coyote Zone”

 

Please visit https://killernashville.com/2018-killer-nashville-awards-winners/ for  finalists and winners in the YA, SciFi/Fantasy/Horror, and Short Story categories, as well as the additional awards of Claymore Awards, Reader's Choice Award, C. Auguste Dupin Detective Award, and John Siegenthaler Legends Award.  Congratulations to all!

 

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!

K9 Fiction: Mysteries, Suspense, and Thrillers

 

Drug sniffing Belgian Malinois, Police Officer Joy

 

Are you a dog owner or a dog lover who loves to read mysteries and thrillers? Then this list was created for you. These are military and law enforcement novels featuring dogs in a primary role. Several of the books were recommended by fans of the Nightstand Book Reviews website, and others were suggested by NBR subscribers themselves.

 

Click on the author names. Those links will take you to their websites and more information about the novels. Let us know in the comments below if you have enjoyed the books.  🙂

 

Robert Crais  “Suspect” & “The Promise,” feature Maggie, the police dog and her handler Scott James, both war veterans. “Suspect” has been optioned for a movie.

 

Susan Furlong  “Splintered Silence,” Book #1 in the Bone Gap Travellers series. A war veteran and her injured military dog return to Appalachia and solve a crime. Rave reviews. More books on the way.

 

Alex Kava   “Breaking Creed” is Book #1 in the Ryder Creed series. Ex-Marine, Ryder Creed, and his K-9 Search and Rescue dogs, team with FBI profiler Maggie O’Dell.

 

Diane Kelly  “Paw Enforcement” is the first book of nine in the Paw Enforcement Mystery series. Police officer Megan Luz and her loyal K-9 partner Brigit, are the heart of the series.

 

Ronie Kendig  A Breed Apart faith based, action oriented series about military war dogs and their handlers.

 

Margaret Mizushima “Killing Trail” is the first of the award-winning Timber Creek K9 Mysteries featuring Deputy Mattie Cobb, her police dog partner Robo, and veterinarian Cole Walker. Set in Colorado.

 

Paula Munier  “Borrowing of Bones” features a retired soldier and her bomb-sniffing dog who work with U.S. Game Warden Troy Warner and his Search and Rescue canine, in a mystery set in rural Vermont.

 

Barbara Nickless  “Blood on the Tracks” Railroad police Special Agent Sydney Parnell and her K9 partner Clyde, solve crimes in this gritty new thriller series.

 

Spencer Quinn   Chet and Bernie Mysteries with Chet, the canine narrator, who works alongside Bernie, a down-on-his-luck private investigator.

 

Nora Roberts “The Search” Search and Rescue dog trainer/romantic suspense set in the Pacific Northwest.

 

James Rollins and Grant Blackwood, The Tucker Wayne series. Part of the Sigma Force world, featuring former Army Ranger Tucker Wayne and Kane, his military working dog companion.

 

David Rosenfelt  Andy Carpenter series. Carpenter is a New Jersey lawyer, a dog lover whose cases always revolve around dogs.

Bloodhound, Police Officer Bocephus

 

Happy Reading!   🙂

 

 

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!