crime

Barry Awards – 2017

 

BarryAwardBanner

The Barry Awards, which began in 1997, are presented at the annual Bouchercon World Mystery Convention, this year to be held in Canada. Voted on by readers of the Deadly Pleasures mystery magazine, the award was named in honor of Barry Gardner, an American critic and lover of great crime fiction.

Take a look at this year’s nominees for the Barry Awards:

 

Best Novel

Where It Hurts by Reed Farrel Coleman
The Wrong Side of Goodbye by Michael Connelly
The Second Life of Nick Mason by Steve Hamilton
Wilde Lake by Laura Lippman
A Great Reckoning by Louise Penny
The Second Girl by David Swinson

 

Best First Novel

Dodgers by Bill Beverly
I’m Traveling Alone by Samuel Bjork
IQ by Joe Ide
The Drifter by Nicholas Petrie
I’m Thinking of Ending Things by Iain Reid
Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner

 

Best Paperback Original

Under the Harrow by Flynn Berry
The Heavens May Fall by Allen Eskens
The Queen’s Accomplice by Susan Elia MacNeal
The Darkest Secret by Alex Marwood
Rain Dogs by Adrian McKinty
The Girl in the Window by Jake Needham

 

Best Thriller

Overwatch by Matthew Betley
First Strike by Ben Coes
Guilty Minds by Joseph Finder
Back Blast by Mark Greaney
The One Man by Andrew Gross
Collecting the Dead by Spencer Kope

 

Congratulations to all the nominees!   :-)

 

Irish Mysteries – 2017

 

 

DingleboghouseFlip

St. Patrick’s Day will be here soon! For those of you that focus your reading on holiday/cultural themed books, the list below features Irish writers and/or mysteries set in Ireland. Some are modern classics, some are newbies, but all are entertaining reads. You’re sure to find a title in the list of 30 Irish Mysteries that you will want to read again and again.

 

Lisa Alber: “Whispers in the Mist”

S. Furlong-Bollinger: “Paddy Whacked”

Sheila Connolly: "Cruel Winter"

Kathi Daley: “Shamrock Shenanigans”

Frank Delaney: "Shannon"

Nelson Demille: “Cathedral”

Tana French: “Faithful Place”

Alexia Gordon: “Murder in G Major”

Andrew Greeley: “Irish Tweed”

Jane Haddam: “A Great Day for the Deadly”

Lyn Hamilton: “The Celtic Riddle”

Lee Harris: “The St. Patrick's Day Murder”

Erin Hart: “Haunted Ground” review here

Jonathan Harrington: “A Great Day for Dying”

Mary Anne Kelly: “Twillyweed”

Amanda Lee: “The Long Stitch Good Night”

Wendi Lee: “The Good Daughter”

Dan Mahoney: “Once in, Never Out”

Brian McGilloway: “Little Girl Lost”

Ralph M. McInerny: “Lack of the Irish”

Leslie Meier: “St. Patrick's Day Murder”

Stuart Neville: "Ghosts of Belfast”

Carlene O'Connor: "Murder at an Irish Wedding"

Sister Carol Anne O’Marie: “Death Takes Up A Collection”

Helen Page: "Equal of God"

Louise Phillips: “The Doll’s House”

Janet Elaine Smith: “In St. Patrick's Custody”

JJ Toner: “St. Patrick's Day Special”

Peter Tremayne: “The Devil’s Seal”

Kathy Hogan Trochek: “Irish Eyes”

 

If your favorite Irish Mysteries are not on the list, let me know in the comments below and I’ll add them!  :-)

Happy choosing and reading!

 

 

 

The Hammett Prize – 2017

 

hammett_prize

The Hammett Prize is bestowed each year by The International Association of Crime Writers (North American Branch). The award will be given for a 2016 work of literary excellence in the field of crime writing by a US or Canadian author, in October. The winner receives the famous ‘Thin Man’ bronze trophy, and bragging rights.   :-)

 

The nominees for this year are listed below. Please click on the book title to find out more about the novel.

 

The Second Life of Nick Mason, by Steve Hamilton (G.P. Putnam's Sons) 
The Drifter, by Nicholas Petrie (G.P. Putnam's Sons) 
The White Devil, by Domenic Stansberry (Molotov Editions) 
Revolver, by Duane Swierczynki (Mulholland Books) 
The Big Nothing, by Bob Truluck (Murmur House Press)

 

Past winners include:

2015: The Do-Right by Lisa Sandlin

2014: Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King

2013: Angel Baby by Richard Lange

2012: Oregon Hill by Howard Owen

2011: The Killer is Dying by James Sallis

2010: The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer

2009: The Manual of Detection by Jedediah Berry

2008: The Turnaround by George Pelecanos

 

Have you read any of the 2016 nominated books? Or the Hammett Prize winners from previous years? Now’s your chance.  :-)


 

“What She Knew” by Gilly Macmillan

Book Cover - What She Knew

 

 

 

In “What She Knew,” Rachel Finch hesitates, but finally gives her son, Ben, permission to run ahead of her to the swings in a park they have been to many times before. She doesn’t want to be seen as an over protective mother. But when she reaches the swings, he isn’t there and is nowhere to be found.

 

A sense of sorrow envelops the reader at the beginning of “What She Knew,” as Rachel shares the story from her point of view – what could she have done better/differently/instead of, during those minutes leading up to and after Ben’s disappearance? Her story is heart wrenching as she explores her own actions and reactions in the face of enormously challenging circumstances.

 

Macmillan spares no one, however, and the other stakeholders – the father, the new wife, the investigators – all take turns at center stage, examining their own guilt and excuses as the 8-day search continues. There is plenty of ‘would have, should have’ to pass around when fingers are pointed and accusations fly. People try to help her cope for a while, but Rachel pushes them away in despair, certain that they cannot truly understand. And, of course, they can’t.

 

Is Rachel or some other trusted adult at fault? People even remotely involved with the child are questioned, then questioned again. The detective work is painstakingly difficult; the media attention excruciating and sometimes misplaced and vicious.

 

Do we, the readers, remember every detail about every person, bush, swing, and shrub that we pass on our daily walks in the park? Unless we are in the middle of some kind of memory training game, probably not. And, yet that’s exactly what Rachel is asked to do. Every second, every step, every motive, must be accounted for.

 

“What She Knew” is an astonishing page-turner, and by seeing the reactions to the crime through the major players involved, Macmillan gets us, the readers, highly invested. I found myself defending the parents, then faulting the parents, defending the detectives and faulting the system as the kidnapping details were explained and suspects revisited.

 

Macmillan has written fully fleshed out characters, with emotionally believable reactions and dialogue, with devastating twists and turns. Who did it and why? Were the right people investigated/punished? ‘Is the investigative process itself, flawed?’ may be a question that haunts you long after the last page of “What She Knew” is read.

 

Although the action in “What She Knew” takes place in England (where the book is called “Burnt Paper Sky”) the themes are sadly universal and missing children remain a terrible part of our culture. Check out NamUs.gov and the UK missing children’s sites for more information. Read “How long has your daughter been missing?” for related details about missing persons.

 

Please visit www.gillymacmillan.com  for news about Macmillan and her other work. “What She Knew” is an international bestseller and her latest book, “The Perfect Girl,” was published in the USA in September, 2016.

 

 

 

Author Profile: Craig Allen Johnson

 

craigjohnsonsigningimg_3937_2

The Walt Longmire character that Craig Allen Johnson has brought to life both in award-winning books and on TV, has come to personify the modern Western law man – rough, tough, and ready for whatever the bad guys can throw at him.

 

Somehow, I had not realized that the show was based on Johnson’s books until the first season was half over. Books? Well, I ran right out – really – and bought the books that my local store had in stock. I started with Cold Dish and was forever hooked.

 

I watched the Longmire series on A&E until somebody in the network offices lost their collective minds and cancelled the show because the demographic didn’t fit their model of the future. Say what? A successful show that millions of people watch, that is making your corporation money and you don’t like the people who are doing the watching? Hmph.

 

Well, we fans are not a dumb bunch and we mounted a social media campaign for another network to pick up the show. Netflix and the Johnson people were able to come to an agreement and the fans collectively smiled. It has been reported that the Netflix association may come to an end after Season 6, but we still have the fabulous bestselling books – with more to come.

 

Craig Johnson was born in West Virginia, but wound up in Wyoming some years after a visit while delivering horses. He built the 2,000+ square foot log cabin in which he and his wife, Judy, now live. Ucross, Wyoming is sparsely populated – a mere 25 inhabitants – and is the source for Johnson’s twitter handle: @ucrosspop25.    

 

What makes Sheriff Walt Longmire so immediately likable? Middle-aged, experienced at his job, widower of a woman he loved more than life itself, an attorney daughter of whom he is so very proud, and a Cheyenne best friend/sidekick whom he has known since childhood. Longmire mostly follows the rules, but when justice is in question, the rules are sometimes open to interpretation.

 

The stories are full of wonderful dialogue, intriguing mysteries, life and death situations, and a core set of characters with whom you’d like to spend as much time as possible. Johnson’s obvious love of the wide-open spaces of Wyoming spills onto the pages when the landscape becomes a character, as suddenly dangerous as any killer could be or as mesmerizing as a beautiful painting.

 

The books have been credited as having one of the best depictions of Native American/White Man interactions in the world of fiction – they certainly ring true in the reading. Johnson’s ranch is right next to a Cheyenne reservation, and through the years he has come to respect the challenges that Native Americans have faced and continue to face. His books explore the cultural differences and celebrate the traditions in thoughtful and meaningful ways, often including those themes in the mysteries.

 

When not writing the Longmire series, consulting on the TV show, or working his ranch, Johnson travels around the country (and to France) with Judy, doing book tours. I met him in Raleigh, NC at Quail Ridge Books. He’s charming and as funny in person as you would hope him to be after having read the books.

 

A great showman who delivers a great read.  :-)

 

Take a look at the reviews of:

 

"The Cold Dish"
Book Cover - Cold Dish

 

 

  here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                 "Kindness Goes Unpunished"

Book Cover - Kindness Goes Unpunished

                                                here

 

                                                                             "Dry Bones"

book-cover-dry-bones

 

 

                                                 

                                            

                                                           here

 

 

 

 

Check out www.craigallenjohnson.com, where you will find details about his upcoming tours, the online fan store with lots of Longmire goodies, and photos of the cast of Longmire.

 

 

*Photo of Craig Allen Johnson taken by Patti Phillips at Quail Ridge Books in Raleigh, NC.

 

 

Bloody Scotland Crime Book of the Year 2016

 

bloodyscotland2016-jpg

 

The Scotland Crime Book of the Year Award is given at Bloody Scotland, a premier conference for crime writers. The winner receives 1,000 pounds and the book is promoted for a year at Waterstone’s, a major book chain in the UK. This year The McIlvanney Prize was awarded on September 9th. This year’s long list, chosen by an independent panel of readers, is below, with the four finalists noted with ‘*’. The winner at Bloody Scotland was chosen by a librarian, a journalist and a newspaper editor. Click on the book title to find out more about the book.

 

The winner is indicated in red.

 

*Black Widow – Chris Brookmyre

The Special Dead – Lin Anderson

* The Jump – Doug Johnstone

A Fine House in Trinity – Lesley Kelly

In the Cold Dark Ground – Stuart MacBride

*Splinter the Silence – Val McDermid

The Damage Done – James Oswald

Even Dogs in the Wild – Ian Rankin

Open Wounds – Douglas Skelton

*Beloved Poison – E. S. Thomson 

 

Congratulations to the McIlvanney winner and all the nominees at Bloody Scotland!  :-)

 

 

 

 

The Hammett Prize – 2016

 

hammett_prize

The International Association of Crime Writers (North American Branch) awarded the HAMMETT PRIZE for a 2015 work of literary excellence in the field of crime writing by a US or Canadian author, on October 29, 2016. The winner received the famous ‘Thin Man’ bronze trophy, and bragging rights.  :-)

The winner is indicated in red.

Congratulations to Ms. Sandlin and all the nominees:

The Stranger, by Harlan Coben
Sorrow Lake: A March and Walker Crime Novel, by Michael J. McCann
The Whites: A Novel, by Richard Price, writing as Harry Brandt
The Do-Right, by Lisa Sandlin
The Organ Broker: A Novel, by Stu Strumwasser

 

Past winners include:

2014: Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King

 

2013: Angel Baby by Richard Lange


2012: Oregon Hill by Howard Owen

 

2011: The Killer is Dying by James Sallis

 

2010: The Nearest Exit by Olen Steinhauer
 

2009: The Manual of Detection by Jedediah Berry
 

2008: The Turnaround by George Pelecanos

 

2007: The Outlander by Gil Adamson

 

2006: The Prisoner of Guantánamo by Dan Fesperman

 

2005: Alibi by Joseph Kanon

 

Have you read any of the 2015 nominated books? Or the Hammett Prize winners from previous years? Now’s your chance.  :-)