Award

2019 Pulitzer Prize – Journalism

 

 

 

The Pulitzer Prize is one of the most coveted by people in the business of gathering and reporting the news. From the Pulitzer site: “Entries must come from a U.S. newspaper, magazine or news site that publishes regularly. In all cases, entries must adhere to the highest journalistic principles. Broadcast media and their websites are ineligible in all categories. Entries that involve collaboration between an eligible organization and ineligible media will be considered if the eligible organization does the preponderance of the work and publishes it at least simultaneously with the ineligible partner.”


Sooooo…does everybody that wins get the actual medal to take home? Also from the site: “The iconic Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal is awarded each year to the American news organization that wins the Public Service category. It is never awarded to an individual. However, through the years, the Medal has come to symbolize the entire Pulitzer program.”

 

Public Service   South Florida Sun Sentinel
For exposing failings by school and law enforcement officials before and after the deadly shooting rampage at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

 

Breaking News Reporting  Staff of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

For immersive, compassionate coverage of the massacre at Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life synagogue that captured the anguish and resilience of a community thrust into grief.

 

Investigative Reporting Matt Hamilton, Harriet Ryan, Paul Pringle of the Los Angeles Times
For consequential reporting on a University of Southern California gynecologist accused of violating hundreds of young women for more than a quarter-century.


Explanatory Reporting David Barstow, Susanne Craig, Russ Buettner of The New York Times

For an exhaustive 18-month investigation of President Donald Trump’s finances that debunked his claims of self-made wealth and revealed a business empire riddled with tax dodges. (Moved by the Board from the Investigative Reporting category, where it was also entered.)

 

Local Reporting Staff of The Advocate, Baton Rouge, La.

For a damning portrayal of the state’s discriminatory conviction system, including a Jim Crow-era law, that enabled Louisiana courts to send defendants to jail without jury consensus on the accused’s guilt.

 

National Reporting Staff of The Wall Street Journal

For uncovering President Trump’s secret payoffs to two women during his campaign who

claimed to have had affairs with him, and the web of supporters who facilitated the transactions, triggering criminal inquiries and calls for impeachment.

 

International Reporting Maggie Michael, Maad al-Zikry, Nariman El-Mofty of Associated Press

For a revelatory yearlong series detailing the atrocities of the war in Yemen, including theft of food aid, deployment of child soldiers and torture of prisoners.

 

Staff of Reuters, with notable contributions from Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo

For expertly exposing the military units and Buddhist villagers responsible for the systematic expulsion and murder of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar, courageous coverage that landed its reporters in prison.

 

Feature Writing Hannah Dreier of ProPublica

For a series of powerful, intimate narratives that followed Salvadoran immigrants on New York’s Long Island whose lives were shattered by a botched federal crackdown on the international criminal gang MS-13.

 

Commentary Tony Messenger of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For bold columns that exposed the malfeasance and injustice of forcing poor rural Missourians charged with misdemeanor crimes to pay unaffordable fines or be sent to jail.

 

Criticism Carlos Lozada of The Washington Post

For trenchant and searching reviews and essays that joined warm emotion and careful analysis in examining a broad range of books addressing government and the American experience.

 

Editorial Writing Brent Staples of The New York Times

For editorials written with extraordinary moral clarity that charted the racial fault lines in the United States at a polarizing moment in the nation’s history.

 

Editorial Cartooning Darrin Bell, freelancer

For beautiful and daring editorial cartoons that took on issues affecting disenfranchised communities, calling out lies, hypocrisy and fraud in the political turmoil surrounding the Trump administration.

 

Breaking News Photography Photography Staff of Reuters

For a vivid and startling visual narrative of the urgency, desperation and sadness of migrants as they journeyed to the U.S. from Central and South America.

 

Feature Photography Lorenzo Tugnoli of The Washington Post

For brilliant photo storytelling of the tragic famine in Yemen, shown through images in which beauty and composure are intertwined with devastation.

 

Check out the Pulitzer site for winners in other categories (Fiction, the Arts, etc.) https://www.pulitzer.org/news/announcement-2019-pulitzer-prize-winners  
 

 

 

2019 ITW ThrillerFest Awards

 

Thriller writers bring us thrills and chills, keep us awake long into the wee hours of the morning and leave us begging for more. You’re likely to see many of them on top mystery lists all over the world. Take a look at the 2019 ITW Thriller Awards finalists and winners (indicated in red) – great ‘stay awake’ reads!

 

BEST HARDCOVER NOVEL
Lou Berney — NOVEMBER ROAD
Julia Heaberlin — PAPER GHOSTS
Jennifer Hillier — JAR OF HEARTS
Karin Slaughter — PIECES OF HER
Paul Tremblay — THE CABIN AT THE END OF THE WORLD

 

BEST FIRST NOVEL
Jack Carr — THE TERMINAL LIST
Karen Cleveland — NEED TO KNOW
Ellison Cooper — CAGED
Catherine Steadman — SOMETHING IN THE WATER
C. J. Tudor — THE CHALK MAN

 

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL NOVEL
Jane Harper — THE LOST MAN        
John Marrs — THE GOOD SAMARITAN    
Andrew Mayne — THE NATURALIST
Kirk Russell — GONE DARK
Carter Wilson — MISTER TENDER'S GIRL

                     

BEST E-BOOK ORIGINAL NOVEL
Clare Chase — MURDER ON THE MARSHES
Gary Grossman — EXECUTIVE FORCE
Samantha Hayes — THE REUNION
T.S. Nichols — THE MEMORY DETECTIVE        
Alan Orloff — PRAY FOR THE INNOCENT           

 

Please visit http://thrillerwriters.org/thriller-awards/ for Best YA novels and Best Short Story nominees. The winners were announced at ThrillerFest XIV on July 13, 2019 in New York City.

 

 

Congratulations to all!      🙂 
 

 

“Defending Jacob” by William Landay

 

 

“Defending Jacob,” features Andrew Barber as an Assistant DA, with a 22 year stint as part of the District Attorney’s office. A few days after his son’s classmate is stabbed to death, Barber is barred from the case and given a leave of absence from work.
 

His son is accused of the terrible crime, but Barber knows in his bones that Jacob could not have done it. When a devastating secret is uncovered during the investigation into the boy’s death, we realize that Barber may be alone in that belief. Despite incredible pressure from everyone he knows, as well as additional evidence to the contrary, he never stops declaring his son’s innocence.
 

“Defending Jacob” explores family relationships as they evolve in the aftermath of horrific events. This absorbing psychological courtroom drama deftly captures the doubts and the pointing fingers as members of the community seek to find answers for this senseless stabbing/killing. What parenting lack created this apparently crazed teenager living amongst them? Or was it a flaw in the child himself? If ‘x’ can kill, how certain can we be that someone else might not be capable of the same act? “Defending Jacob” was published in 2012, but the story could be ripped from the headlines today.
 

Landay, a former DA himself, posits a few theories to explain the multi-faceted plot lines and has several characters explore the possibility of a murder gene – that murder can be committed because of a hereditary predisposition. Modern psychological profiling indicates that the level of violence in our backgrounds most likely informs our future actions, but is there an actual gene? And, in my opinion, most disturbing of all: Does law enforcement really pick a suspect and then go after evidence to support that theory, no matter how far a stretch from the truth?
 

The ending left me stunned, contemplating which character was, in the end, most damaged. I may never resolve that in my mind. This was a riveting read from start to finish and beyond.
 

“Defending Jacob” won the Strand Critics Award, and a movie based on the book may be released this year.  Please visit www.williamlanday.com for information about Landay’s other books.

 

*Note: contains sporadic swearing/coarse language.

 

Pulitzer Prize – 2017

 

PulitzerPrizeMedal

The Pulitzer Prize is an award given for work published the previous year in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and the arts in the United States. Joseph Pulitzer, an innovative newspaper publisher, endowed Columbia University in New York City with $2 million in his 1904 will. Columbia was to create the School of Journalism, as well as scholarships and prizes to promote excellence in certain fields. The intent of the gift was “for the encouragement of public service, public morals, American literature, and the advancement of education."

 

The President of Columbia has the honor of presenting the yearly awards selected by the Pulitzer Prize board. Pulitzer has evolved over the decades and an expanded prize list now also includes the digital age. The judging is rigorous and to win is considered by many to be the pinnacle in a career.

Click on the titles to read more about each of the books.
 

Fiction 2017

Presented for distinguished fiction published in book form during the previous year by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. Fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).
 

The Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead (Doubleday)

"For a smart melding of realism and allegory that combines the violence of slavery and the drama of escape in a myth that speaks to contemporary America."

Other finalists:

Imagine Me Gone, by Adam Haslett (Little, Brown)

The Sport of Kings, by C. E. Morgan (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

 

General Nonfiction 2017

For a distinguished and appropriately documented book of nonfiction by an American author that is not eligible for consideration in any other category. Fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).
 

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, by Matthew Desmond (Crown)

"For a deeply researched exposé that showed how mass evictions after the 2008 economic crash were less a consequence than a cause of poverty."

Other finalists:

In a Different Key: The Story of Autism, by John Donvan and Caren Zucker (Crown)

The Politics of Mourning: Death and Honor in Arlington National Cemetery, by Micki McElya (Harvard University Press)

 

Congratulations to all for this wonderful achievement.  🙂

 

Please visit www.pulitzer.org for more information and for the list of prizewinners in other disciplines.

 

The Man Booker Prize International – 2017

 

ManBookerLogo

Famous for its celebration of global fiction, this year’s Man Booker International Prize  competition was among the 13 titles in the longlist below. The £50,000 prize is divided equally between the author of the winning book and its translator. Previously, the prize had been given every other year to an author for an entire body of work. The new version of the Man Book International Prize acknowledges the importance of the quality of a translation in a global publication and is now given annually. The books must have been translated into English and published in the UK.
 

The six titles in the short list group are listed in bold type. The winner is indicated in red.

Click on the book titles to discover more information about the books.
 

Mathias Enard        "Compass"                                     

Translated by Charlotte Mandell
 


Wioletta Greg            "Swallowing Mercury"                 

Translated by Eliza Marciniak

 

David Grossman    "A Horse Walks Into a Bar"  

Translated by Jessica Cohen

 

Stefan Hertmans      "War and Turpentine"                 

Translated by David McKay

 

Roy Jacobsen          "The Unseen"                                 

Translated by Don Bartlett

 

Ismail Kadare           "The Traitor’s Niche"                   

Translated by John Hodgson

 

Yan Lianke               "The Explosion Chronicles"       

Translated by Carlos Rojas

 

Alain Mabanckou       "Black Moses"                          

Translated by Helen Stevenson

 

Clemens Meyer         "Bricks and Mortar"                    

Translated by Katy Derbyshire

 

Dorthe Nors             "Mirror, Shoulder, Signal"          

Translated by Misha Hoekstra

 

Amos Oz                   "Judas"                                          

Translated by Nicholas de Lange

 

Samanta Schweblin     "Fever Dream"                        

Translated by Megan McDowell

 

Jón Kalman Stefánsson   "Fish Have No Feet"        

Translated by Phil Roughton

 

Congratulations to all the nominees and to the winner!  🙂

 

Shamus Awards – 2017

 

PWA logo

Bouchercon, the largest international mystery lovers convention, held in October this year, is a natural platform for several writing awards. In addition to the Anthony, Barry, and Macavity Awards for excellence in mysteries, the PWA’s Shamus Awards-2017 were given for deserving Private Eye titles published in 2016. (The winners were announced before the convention.)

 

The Private Eye Writers of America, focuses on Private Eye fiction alone. PWA’s definition of a Private Eye: a person paid to investigate crimes who is not employed by a government agency.

 

The winners are noted in red, with the other finalists immediately after. Congratulations to all!   🙂
 

Best Original Private Eye Paperback
Vaseem Khan, The Perplexing Theft of the Jewel in the Crown. Red Hook Books 

Michael Craven, The Detective and the Chinese High-Fin. Harper Collins
O'Neil De Noux,  Hold Me, Babe. Big Kiss Publications
Erle Stanley Gardner,  The Knife Slipped. Hard Case Crime
Manuel Ramos, My Bad. Arte Publico Press

 

Best First Private Eye Novel
Joe Ide, IQ.  Little, Brown

Tim Baker, Fever City. Europa Editions
D. P. Lyle, Deep Six.  Oceanview Publishing
David Swinson, The Second Girl. Little, Brown
Richard Vine, Soho Sins. Hard Case Crime

 

Best Private Eye Short Story
Brendan DuBois, “A Battlefield Reunion” in AHMM, June
Lawrence Block, “Keller’s Fedora” (e-publication)
Ake Edwardson, “Stairway From Heaven” in Stockholm Noir, Akashic
Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins, “A Dangerous Cat” in The Strand. Feb-May
Dave Zeltserman, “Archie On Loan” in EQMM, Sept.-Oct.

 

Best Private Eye Novel
Reed Farrel Coleman, Where It Hurts. Putnam
Lindsey Davis, The Graveyard of the Hesperides. Minotaur
Timothy Hallinan, Fields Where They Lay. Soho Crime
Al Lamanda, With 6 You Get Wally. Gale Cengage
Robert S. Levinson, The Stardom Affair.  Five Star

 

 

 

Anthony Awards 2017 – Bouchercon

 

BoucherconLogoToronto 2017

 

The World Mystery Convention, usually referred to as Bouchercon, is an annual conference named after Anthony Boucher, a mystery author and critic who helped found the Mystery Writers of America. This event honors various segments of the mystery and crime fiction community.

 

The nominees for the Anthony Awards 2017 were chosen by attendees at the 2016 convention, as well as early registrants for the 2017 event. The recognized works were published during 2016 and the winners were  announced on October 15th, after the Sunday Brunch. You’ll notice some returning authors on the list of nominees as well as great new entries.

 

The winners are indicated in red.

 

Best Novel

  • “You Will Know Me” – Megan Abbott
  • “Where It Hurts” – Reed Farrel Coleman
  • “Red Right Hand” – Chris Holm
  • “Wilde Lake” – Laura Lippman
  • “A Great Reckoning” – Louise Penny

 

Best First Novel

  • “Dodgers” – Bill Beverly
  • “IQ” – Joe Ide
  • “Decanting a Murder” – Nadine Nettmann
  • “Design for Dying” – Renee Patrick
  • “The Drifter” – Nicholas Petrie

 

Best Paperback Original

  • “Shot in Detroit” – Patricia Abbott
  • “Leadfoot” – Eric Beetner
  • “Salem’s Cipher” – Jess Lourey
  • “Rain Dogs” – Adrian McKinty
  • “How to Kill Friends and Implicate People” – Jay Stringer
  • “Heart of Stone” – James W. Ziskin  

 

Best Short Story

  • “Oxford Girl” – Megan Abbott, Mississippi Noir
  • “Autumn at the Automat” – Lawrence Block, In Sunlight or in Shadow
  • “Gary’s Got A Boner” – Johnny Shaw, Waiting to Be Forgotten
  • “Parallel Play” – Art Taylor, Chesapeake Crimes: Storm Warning
  • “Queen of the Dogs” – Holly West, 44 Caliber Funk: Tales of Crime, Soul and Payback

 

Best Anthology

  • “Unloaded: Crime Writers Writing Without Guns” – Eric Beetner, ed.
  • “In Sunlight or in Shadow” – Lawrence Block, ed.
  • “Cannibals: Stories from the Edge of the Pine Barrens” – Jen Conley
  • “Blood on the Bayou: Bouchercon Anthology 2016” – Greg Herren, ed.
  • “Waiting To Be Forgotten: Stories of Crime and Heartbreak, Inspired by the Replacements” – Jay Stringer, ed.

 

For nominees & winners in the YA, Critical Non-Fiction, and Novella categories, please visit http://bouchercon2017.com/anthony-awards/

 

Congratulations to all the Anthony Awards-2017 nominees and winners!  🙂

 

Previous winners include:

2016:

BEST NOVEL – “The Killing Kind” – Chris Holm   

BEST FIRST NOVEL – “Past Crimes” – Glen Erik Hamilton 

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL – “The Long and Faraway Gone” – Lou Berney 

BEST SHORT STORY – "The Little Men: A Bibliomystery" – Megan Abbott 

 

2015:

BEST NOVEL“After I'm Gone” – Laura Lippman

BEST FIRST NOVEL – “The Black Hour” – Lori Rader-Day

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL – “The Day She Died” – Catriona McPherson

BEST SHORT STORY – "The Odds Are Against Us" Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, Nov 2014 – Art Taylor

 

2014:

BEST FIRST NOVEL – Matt Coyle’s “Yesterday's Echo”

BEST PAPERBACK ORIGINAL – Catriona McPherson’s “As She Left It”

BEST NOVEL – William Kent Krueger’s “Ordinary Grace”